PWN Politics- New Polling shows Nelzer in second, Clarington jumps to 4th Place

TRENCHENT, FREEDEMIA- The 2018 Presidential Campaign is well underway in Freedemia, and the 6 official candidates are pushing themselves as why they should be the next president.

Polling had been pretty much stagnant since the first poll in early May. However, recent campaigning for two candidates seems to be paying off.

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A recent PWN Poll showed that after a month of hard core campaigning, Katherine Nelzer, CEO of TweetBook, catapulted into second, taking quite a few voters from Incumbent VP Patrick Houser. Incumbent Angela Rosenthal retained the lead, also taking some of Patrick Houser’s supporters. The biggest surprise was Lily Mae Clarington’s leap into 4th place, after having only 1.5% of the vote at the end of June. Craig Schluderman dropped to 2%, continuing his downward trend.

Nelzer seemed like a natural to take voters from Patrick Houser. Both have similar views and similar platforms, emphasizing innovation, health, infrastructure, education, and technology as the next steps. Nelzer, having been the founder and the CEO of TweetBook for several years, is pushing that she has more experience in leadership than Houser’s newscasting career provided him, despite him having served a year as vice president. Houser’s steep drop was a bit surprising, but it was expected that the two would be competing for votes, and it looks like Nelzer’s winning the competition.

Vandover mayor Lily Mae Clarington, after a month of nearly non-stop campaigning to clarify actual stances on things after getting the reputation of an unqualified unprofessional candidate due to her extreme focus on nude tourism and targeting the clothes industry, actually managed to bring up her poll numbers. She’s clarified that her belief in nude tourism is to increase revenue from other sources to fund infrastructure, healthcare, and education while lowering taxes, and that her push to take on “big clothing” is to help the growing small business world of clothes design, manufacture, and sales thrive. More professional presentation and less ranting in her campaigning in cities other than home Vandover has also made her appear more presidential.

However, that 10% for Clarington doesn’t seem to be entirely pushing for Clarington to win outright- Several Clarington supporters actually admitted that their hopes are to propel Clarington into the Vice Presidency, not make her president. About 43% of her supporters said that they believe other candidates might make better presidents, but that they believe Clarington needs to be in the presidential office to help influence the path of the country’s future.

Both Barson and Schluderman seem to have reduced their campaigning and spent more time advocating their ideas. It isn’t unheard of for Freedemian candidates to drop out of the race as long as they are confident their policies will be considered by other candidates. However, at this time there is no evidence either would be dropping out.

Řots Government approves construction of new international airport near Nekkar

(Nekkar, 7 July 2017) – The government of Řots has approved the contruction of a new international airport near the capital, Nekkar. This was announced by traffic minister Gerben Arva Larin this morning. The new airport will replace the existing one, which has been considered too small and out of date. “The facilities at the current airport are not of this time anymore”, the minister said. “Expanding and modernising it at its present location is not possible according to experts, so the government decided to select another site and build a new airport from scratch.”

This new site will be in the province of Māp, east of the towns of Īssikem and Sorteka approximately 35 kilometers from the city centre of Nekkar, where an area will be ‘cut out’ and added as an exclave to the province of Nekkar. The new airport should attract commercial, business, and cargo flights and will include a large business area; the government intends to promote Nekkar as an alternative international hub.

OpEd: 140 years later, let’s remember what really happened to Kristoforo X

By MAYA ABELDARME and TOMAS GALIXENU (via TeleMaura News Ingerish) –

In just under two weeks, Mauretia will come up on one of its most intentionally overlooked anniversaries. In fact, you would be hard-pressed to find anyone even mention it. The tale of 16 July 1877 seems to be a story no one wants to remember. How does abdication only get passing mention in the history books? Our country has gone to great lengths to expunge King Kristoforo X from its annals. No one complained when he was outright omitted from a recent Vuwo! article ranking all our monarchs from best to worst. (We think many did not even notice!) His grave in Lalla Maga is marked by a small block of limestone that is weathering. The marker might as well read, “Here lies a disgraced king that his country will not even acknowledge existed.” The site has deteriorated so poorly that the cemetery was forced to exhume the body and re-lay in a proper hole that would not collapse down the hillside. While we would never defend the king for his actions in the wake of the plague, we believe it is time for our country to recognize the truths of his tortured life, stop ignoring him, and honor him with a proper burial.

Here is how the story usually goes: The death of Queen Pitra during li Mawaṭo Ravo (“The Great Death”), along with much of the ruling government, unleashed a period of political chaos. The country was still at the peak of the plague with thousands dying by the week. Prince Kristoforo was quickly hurried away to The Island to retain succession. The story we always hear then continues to say that he was a reclusive and ineffective king. The country voted four years later to force abdication. That’s it. Nothing more.

Over a century later, we know what really happened in between 1873 and 1877. King Kristoforo X is really a tragic figure. The new king was crowned unceremoniously in a carriage as it scurried away from his dying family in Sansu Andaros li Apostili. The monarch was very ill himself, coughing violently. In the recent exhumation, the forensics and archaeology team noted that he likely suffered broken ribs in such a frail state. When the royal shuttle arrived on The Island, the king had to be carried into the building. He was unable to walk and could not handle the light or sound. He remained bedridden for days. During this time, word leaked out about the decimation of the ruling classes. The public demanded to know where their new king was and what he planned to do. The inexperienced and frightened staff in the royal palace said nothing to the outside world. (Frankly, we as a nation are fortunate Commonia or some other malevolent power did not attack us during this time. We would have been powerless.)

Consider that King Kristoforo, while ill, was tossed directly into the travails of running a collapsing country. He never had the time to mourn the death of his wife or mother; he suffered tremendously from hallucinations and chronic, debilitating pain from plague and treatment-related aftereffects in his central nervous system; and he had no political help in his sequestration, because the plague had claimed so many of the experienced individuals. Only years after the abdication did the truth of his conditions become public. In reality, that was part of the problem. The king wanted so desperately to be seen as strong, so he said nothing of his health. Yet, when he suffered worst and was absent, the opposite occurred. The king could have been a symbol of hope by walking beside his people and visibly sharing their burdens. Instead, he hid and appeared uninterested.

The only reason anger against him did not overflow earlier was that parliament did not want a regency during such a vulnerable time. Shortly after Prince Ferde came of age, parliament passed a resolution for forced abdication. The king was, perhaps surprisingly, not angered by the vote even though he sent his refusal about two hours later. Historians note meetings he held during this two hour window and believe he actually considered stepping aside. Even so, parliament demanded removal. They scheduled the public referendum for the morning of Monday 16 July 1877. All business and work schedules were to be canceled for the morning to allow a national vote. King Kristoforo X must have known what was about to happen. He sent for his son and had a carriage loaded with a few small number of belongings. About nightfall, word reached the palace of the provisional vote totals in Massaeya and Dara Aqarel. Heartbroken, the king quietly walked out to a loaded carriage and set off for the Aziga countryside. Aides and family alike noted that he never stopped to say anything to anyone. Prince Ferde arrived ten minutes after his father’s departure.

Across Mauretia, the final vote total was 85% in favor of abdication. Prince Ferde desperately wanted to distance himself from his father in the public perception. He quietly sent provisions to Lalla Maga to care for the ousted monarch and visited on three occasions. Yet, no public mention was ever given of the former king throughout all of Ferde’s reign. Even parliament went on ignoring the former ruler. When Kristoforo X died a couple years later, only a few townspeople and a local priest attended the funeral. It was revealed that he never once accepted the payments for anything other than his medical care. The former king died alone, ill, and impoverished.

As a people, we grieved and mourned after the plague. We moved on and recovered. But, generally speaking, we have not really forgiven. No, we probably should not be building monuments to or naming streets after Kristoforo X. He did nothing to warrant that. But, do we really have to ignore him? Can a former king at least be given a proper burial? Perhaps Queen Gabriela might even allow his body to be repatriated and buried with his family. Every year, this date in July comes and goes. Maybe in 2017 we can let Mauretia, and its former king, have the closure we all need.

Dr. Maya Abeldarme is a professor of history at the Universita Sansu Trinitu in Masqula.
Dr. Tomas Galixenu is a historian with the Bivlioteqad Nationala ad-Mauretia.

Fortress Party (DW) back in government of Wyster after general elections

HREAWIRC, 2 JULY 2017 | After only a relatively brief interruption of four years, the Fortress Party (Dyrt Warh, DW) will lead Wyster once again. That is the outcome of this morning’s general election, which saw the DW’s seats increase from 49 to 88 of the Uth Binder (‘General Court’)’s 169 seats. The People’s Party (Dyrt Bleugh, DB) lost 32 of its 93 seats and will once again be the largest opposition party. The smaller parties lose seats as well: the Green party (Dyrt Blys) descends from 16 to 9, the Citizen’s Party (Dyrt Ceethceus) from 11 to 8. The new party Unity for the Future (Farstastat ab Muh) enters parliament with three seats.

The policies of prime minister Dharc Ghaestre’s DB government weren’t all that bad, but according to analysts the victory of the DB was mainly caused by the fact that people were tired of the DW after the fourteen years that Taelwyn Healda lead the government from 1999 to 2013. “The people simply wanted a change. Ghaestre and his ministers didn’t receive bad marks, but obviously something didn’t feel right to the voters who considered this a failed ‘experiment’”, one analyst said.

Immediately after the first results were published, Ghaestre announced his resignation as party leader. The leader of the DW, Cillyh Ocurmen, will visit king Mearh first thing tomorrow morning in order to be appointed Ceagrys sie Irhith (‘Chairman of the Government’, or prime minister). “The people of Wyster have made their choice”, Ocurmen said during his victory speech. “After four years of flirting with DB rule they decided that the DW offers them the attention and respect that they knew they need. I promise that we won’t fail them.”

Wyster has a bicameral parliament, the Higurstat Baan (‘Assembly of the Realm’). The first (permanent) chamber is the Uth Binder (‘General Court’), which consists of 169 members who are elected every four years through a first-past-the-post system. The second chamber is the Uth Peg (‘High Court’), which consists of 21 members and convenes only when summoned by either the King, 6/7 of the members of the Uth Binder, or 42,000 citizens (or a combination of these three) to discuss special subjects (e.g. constitution changes).

Nude drunk elite party surprises visitors of commercial centre of Bakiřvē Ots (Řots)

(Kavatořre (Řots), 1 July 2017) – A number of late night shoppers in the commercial centre of Bakiřvē Ots, in the Ēzentep district of Kavatořre near the village of Nī Tek Prusu Loko and the SAF border were awkwardly surprised last night when several dozens of partying people entered the premises – without any clothes on. Shocked passers-by called the police, who arrived shortly afterwards. It turned out to be a mixture of lower nobility and several upper class persons whose party had started at the nearby Kīvi estate earlier in the evening.

“For the sake of their privacy the police won’t mention the names of those involved, although we suspect that several pictures may pop up at social media in the next couple of hours”, a spokeswoman of the police told the press. “I can mention however that among the guests of Lord Kīvi were noted local politicians, a few captains of industry and several members of the nobility whose identities we are in the process of varifying – which, as you know, is complicated.

“The cause of this problem has been identified as an alcoholic substance that causes almost instant drunkenness and makes you feel hot so that one’s first instinct is to undress. The effect may take several hours to wear off. We questioned the assistants of a noble woman who is suspected of having brought several bottles to the party and is the only one whom we encountered still dressed.”

The noble woman was reveiled (by herself) to be Maro Tōr, the Duchess of Kartori. She is one of the few members of the higher nobility that hasn’t retreated in their castles and estates since the middle ages to live by the Codex of Řots, a set of laws and protocols that over time has made governing the country so impossible that common citizens started to form their own modern society, now almost twohundred years ago. The Duchess is often seen in high society situations and generally tends to behave oddly.

The Duchess denies having anything to do with it this time however. “Of course I didn’t bring these bottles of … what was it called? Shputs? Shlurp? … to the party? How could I? I wasn’t even aware that these nice people would react like this if they drank it! The person who sold them to me only told me that those who consumed it would have a great time!”